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and then dropped them. i quote a horrified aid to then-secretary of state kissinger as exclaiming that the united states had abandoned the kurds 1975 algiers agreement when the shah of iran and saddam hussein came to an accord over their border dispute and suddenly iran and american support for the kurds stopped and kissinger replied to this aid covert work should not be confused with missionary work. this is an example -- i cite other examples of other cynicism on the part of soviet union. this is an example of how small peoples, how small countries got caught up in the cold war. i talk in another chapter about how the cold war had an impact on democracy in this region. now, let me start by saying something about a widely held myth about the middle east and it's something i talked about in an earlier book of mine, "resurrecting empire" there never was democracy in the middle east. this is a region that has been plagued by autocracy or authoritarian government. there's a kernel of truth to this. in that certainly since the '60s or the '70s the middle east has been a black hole where democracy is
coming up. there is a new information regarding pakistani terrorists. henry kissinger goes on the record. the town hall process continues. >> [unintelligible] >> it triples premiums. >> stand up and fight. we woke vote -- we will vote you out. [unintelligible] [applause] >> it got a little bit rough these days. next question. he did not answer it. he taught in circles. >> people come to town meetings who have objections. i emphasize that they may not be representative of america. their views have to be taken into account. >> there is some disagreement. >> how are we supposed trust you? is there an option to say no to this bill? >> it is not about health care reform or insurance reform. it is about government control. >> i charge you with usurping authority not granted to you as a u.s. senator. >greta: houston, texas a councilwoman answers a cell phone while a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> if you're conscious allows you, what are you doing for america -- >> seriously, really. come on. [unintelligible] >> do you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy aske
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them to extract a ransom from the united states. >> eric: this morning henry kissinger as you point out in the "washington post" calls it blackmail. >> i was very happy to see former secretary of state kissinger's op-ed, i think he's right on target. expressed concerns, very similar to what i have been saying, that when you get the americans out, as was done this week with the two journalists you want to do it in a way that does not increase this risk for other americans. we can see in iran right now, the three americans there, who have been moved from the border area with iraq, to tehran and we see employees of the british and french embassy now put on trial by the iranian authorities, including one french national. so, the risk here i think is very real, and the concern about giving in to these in fact terrorist demands, something i think should concern us greatly. >> eric: we have the freedom we are looking at for these two and there are three american hikers now held by iran and seems sometimes these innocent americans can be pawns in the international chess board by these rogue sta
security adviser, henry kissinger, drew the lesson from past efforts to negotiate with both the chinese and the russians that peripheral intelligence operations more frequently would result in scuttling these diplomatic overtures than not and therefore he went about shutting down all operations targeting the chinese that he felt had any risk of ruining next on's opening to china. one of them, sadly beings was support for the tibetans. it's often been said and you'll find it in a lot of the literature, that the chinese insisted that the u.s. drop its support for the tibetans in order to establish relations with the chinese. sadly, in our research, we found that there really isn't anything to document the fact that the chinese insisted on this, an on the contrary, there's plenty of information to show that it was the american side that unilaterally cut off support for the chinese. it began by demobilizing the fighters at the guerrilla base in mustang, trying to reintegrate them into civilian operations, but by 1974, it had reached the point where in order to set up formal diplomatic recog
's not in the -- she's not in the policy meetings. we've lost the day of john foster dulles and henry kissinger she is popular in that role, these images don't foster that. >> bonnie: but condi rice was quite popular. >> but what we learned from africa was extremely important. not only was president clinton sent to save the day, but these hot-spots all over the globe, these seasoned elder statesman men, from ho holbrook to george mitchell. >> anybody who t thinks that hillary clinton is not in on the policy of this administration, doesn't know hillary and doesn't know the administration. i love the notion that instead of having a secretary of state that sits there, and worries over these spots, she has agents out at these spots. and i also don't believe, i believe it is much too early, to write her off as no john foster dulles. this woman has such personal and imuintellectual power, that when she starts to fill that office you will know. >> i don't know, i think it will be a big leap to say that the country will see that type leadership again. but i would not discount her ability to come out as a
. >> but if you are secretary of state, kissinger or george shultz, you are the guy makes policy. you are the guys who ends up in beijing, not richard holbrooke. >> she and richard holbrooke -- i agree with evan on this -- richard holbrooke was a strong supporter of hers. he did not add up over her objections or resistance. -- did not get that job over her objections or resistance. this was a very important trip that she just took. i think her importance -- she went to asia as secretary of state -- basically a figure almost equal to the president in visiting any place. >> and the world has got enough problems -- we have so many hot spots now around the world that a team of envoys is a good idea. i think it is a credit to her to have the self-confidence to have that team working around her and to not feel all, despite what trawls would have felt if it was him -- charles would have felt if it was him. >> but she is human and she feels her husband's overbearing presence from time to time. >> i join in prison -- in praising her. but if you were there, he would be bothered, too. >> you special olympian
around. that is a pretty equalatch. >> but if you are secretaryf ate, kissinger george shtz, you are the guy who makes policy. you are the guy who en up in beijing, not richard holbrooke and you stuck in kinshasa. >> i agree with evann this -- richard horooke was a strong supporter of furs, and he did not get that job over h objecons or resistance. i wou say that this wasn important trip thashe just talk -- took. her importance when she went to asia as secrety of state -- when she comesn, she is basically a figure almost as big as the predent in visiting any place. >> i tnk that the wld has got enough problems -- we have so many hot ots now around the wod, that a team of envoys a good idea, and i think it is a credit to half self-confidence to have that team working aund her and to not fee all the slides thatharles would hav felt if itas him >> but it is tr that she is humaand she feels her husband'overbearing presee from time time. just for a moment she owed it. >> ioined in praising he pre all i'm saying is thatf you were i kinshasa, you wouldbe bother, too. >> a word on theas
kissinger became secretary of state, he found out the way to end the rivalry was to fulfill both positions. in the obama administration, the white house is where the policy is, not the various cabinet agencies. but hilary clinton is different, isn't she? she's still an enormously popular figure in the democratic party, still one of the most admired americans both at home and abroad, and still a woman of formative talent and drive. can she use all that to carve out a role, and what distinctive mark does she want to leave in her position of secretary of state? what is her vision for the world. these are some of the questions i asked her in nairobi, kenya. so let's get started. >> madam secretary, thank you very much for taking time out of this very hectic schedule to spend it with us. >> thank you, fareed. thank you for coming to nairobi for this opportunity. >> it's my pleasure. north kwor korea. tell us a little more about it. president clinton comes back. he spends three hours talking to the leader of korea. what is his impression? >> we're going to get a full briefing, which we really ha
of the president. when henry kissinger became secretary of state, he found the juan w one way to end that rivalry was for one person to occupy both positions. hillary clinton is different, isn't she? she's still an enormously popular figure in the democratic figure, still one of the most admired americans both at home and abroad, and still a woman of formidable talent and drive. can she use all that to carve out a role and what distinctive mark does she want to leave in her position as secretary of state? what is her vision for the world? these are some of the questions i asked her in nairobi, kenya. let's get started. >> madam secretary, thank you for taking time out of this very hectic schedule to spend with us. >> thank you fareed. thank you for coming to nairobi for this opportunity. >> it is my pleasure. north korea, tell us a little bit more about it. so president clinton comes back, he spends three hours talking to the leader of north korea, kim jong-il what was his impression? >> we're going to get a full debriefing which we really haven't had a chance to get. >> you haven't had the chanc
by secretary of state kissinger, the man who would, under the law, have to accept a presidential resignation letter. when kissinger left, the president spent some time with his family and some aides report his daughters tried to talk him into continue to toughing it out. the president understood the message from his house and senate visitors and was seriously considering resignation as an option. by early this morning, vice president gerald's ford's office announced a trip to the west coast and hawaii planned by the vice president was being postponed. a short time later mr. ford was summoned to the white house. he spent an hour and ten minutes with the president. as they met in the oval office, a breathless white house aide, who refused to be identified, confirmed mr. ford was being told of president nixon's decision to resign and make gerry ford president. a few minutes after noon, the vice president left the white house, newsmen were called to the press briefing room and ronald zeigler, one of the few aide who is remained with mr. nixon since the beginning announced the president would add
would have paid any attention to it. smoz it was henry kissinger, everybody would have laughed and said they cuffed henry. it would have been a joke. >> if he were white, all of those talk show hosts who are screaming now about what obama did would be saying this is the sanctity of a man's home and it was invaded by the storm troopers. >> you are telling me if it was alan dershowitz we would have complained if they cuffed him? >> maybe not dershowitz. >> the fact that henry louis gates is a famous guy, a harvard professor is what brought it to the national station stage. this is a good opportunity -- >> do you think professor gates was outraged? they brought him to the police headquarters and photographed him. >> when i came to the states, the first thing i was told was don't argue with cops. i'm always more careful in states. >>> the final question before we go to the exit question is, the performance of the sergeant at the press conference. was it flawless? >> i think the sergeant is a very large -- >> is he a political figure now? >> he's very positive. he's a potential political fig
and henry kissinger was across from me and paul warrenky, both arms control experts and i was this 30-year-old kid and harriman had a way of including everyone in the conversation. they were talking about a complicated arms control agreement, and this discussion was going on and all of a sudden harriman looked at me and said, joe, what do the young people think about this? [laughter] >> i didn't know what the hell to say, john. i was squared to death. i didn't want to make a fool of me. here i was a united states senator. so i reached over and picked an object up off the coffee table. and i was nervous and i was flipping it back and forth in my hands, i guess, as i answered the question. and i noticed everyone stiffened up when i was talking. and the butler came in and said time for dinner and everybody immediately got up and bolted for the dinner table. and your dad grabbed my arm and said damn it, put that thing down, that costs more than your house. i was flipping a faberge egg in my hands. so the sophisticated kid from delaware. [laughter] >> it seemed like every single thing i did he
to me, henry kissinger was across from me, both arms control experts. and i was this 30-year-old kid, and he had a way of sort of trying to include everybody in the conversation. they were talking about a complicated arms control agreement, used to be the salt agreement. and this discussion was going on, and all of a sudden he looked at me and said, well, joe, what do the young people think about this? i didn't know what to say, john, i was scared to death, i didn't want to make a fool of me. here i was a united states senator. so i reached over and picked an object up off the coffee table. and i was nervous and i was flipping it back and forth in my hands like this as i answered the question. and i noticed everyone stiffened up when i was talking. and the butler came in and said time for dinner and everybody immediately got up and bolted for the dinner table. grabbed my arm and my arm and said, dammit, put that thing down. that costs more than your house. it was a faberge egg in my hand. so the sophisticated kid from delaware. it seemed like every single thing i did, he was there w
written in columns come out in the book. c-span: you say that henry kissinger, john negroponte and al haig were all sources. >> guest: they were more rowlie's sources the my source, yes. c-span: and what we? >> guest: c-span: did you feel y were being used or did you -- >> guest: i didn't have a -- i got some contact with john negroponte. i never got much out of a page and kissinger. it was beaten's sources. c-span: but you do say that you don't remember ever criticizing henry kissinger in a column. >> guest: no, i criticized how lot. in the book as i criticized him that rowlie never criticized him so we had attention on that, but i was highly critical of henry. all the criticism in the column of henry was from me and not from rowlie. these little things were more complicated because we were a partnership and we had to kind of part in these things out on how it would come out in the column. c-span: and he said that bald heldman, chief of staff to richard nixon was treated more harshly because he refused to contact you, he refused to talk with you. brian >> guest: i think yes. probably just
and he got it. there is the former president sitting right next to him. henry kissinger writes this this morning in the op-ed piece in "the washington post." >> did this president just hand kim jong-il a propaganda victory? >> i don't think so. i mean, maybe in kim jong-il's mind and he'll play it out inside of north korea any way he wants, but we vetted this mission with the south koreans, the japanese, with the chinese weather the russian, and we had 100% support by all these countries. the former president also asked for the release of a south korean detainee and the japanese abduck tees, which we think would be also a great picture to see the reunification of those families, which we're very concerned about. so, no, i just think that wanted to get those girls out, the north koreans gave us a path to that, and the president of the united states said we want these families reunified. they shouldn't be held in captivity. and by the way, if we hadn't done that, we'd be having a different conversation tonight -- today because they would have said, well, you had an opportunity ju
of thenited states and henry kissinger, and sam nunn. >> especially the gg around reagan >> that's i think the auty of it that it is something that the right wi rublicans generly believin. so it's something we may have a chance to do. >> re: mutlly assured destction is not a good idea. >> i don think it's a good idea. it works up to a pnt. it's not something we suld ly on. >> rose: a do you think the united states, to lead theay, ould reduce s stockpile of weapons by how much? i would say total. i mean i'd lik- >> rose: jt goright out a t rid of all of them andhow the world the right direction. >> that's wt nixonid with biological weapons and iwas a wonderful move. he did it youn lateral beusey so he didn't have to havet ratified by the senate. he didn't have to negoate with anybody. said if we get rid of our weapons we will destroy the stockpiles, d it happened one afternoon. >> rose: would wo be less of a tion? >> i don't think so pu but that's a maer ofpinion. the public believes nuear weapons give them security. i don't ink so. it's auestion of balance, of urse. >> ros: spose we gave u
the nature of the discussion. henry kissinger's opposition today in the post, while we are all happy for these journalists to be reunited to their families we now have three hikers in iran being held by the iranian government. are we going to send bill clinton tehran to get those three out? what is the outcome of that? this was a -- a definite benefit to kim jong-il and the north korean government, this photo-op with former president clinton. >> we'll see if better diplomacy comes of t better relations comes of it. ed gillespie, donna brazile, thanks for coming in. >> straight ahead, how do folks feel at eugene, or goegooregon, the unemployment rate has doubled in the past year? welcome home, man. hot! hot! hot! time to check your air conditioning? come to meineke now and get a free ac system check. at meineke, you're always the driver. . >>> our traveling this week took us out to the pacific northwest to a state that back a quarter century ago was a swing state. this is oregon, back in 1984, when ronald reagan -- blue, blue, blue, blue, and blue. oregon now reliably democratic. let'
saw henry kissinger in those shots. neil: i'm always wondering, the time particularly with the press or thin skinned with the president, this is sort of a bipartisan itchiness with the press. isn't it? i mean, it goes back a long way. nixon, the argument was, it carried it to new levels. did he? you studied the man. >> well, certainly nixon velt victimized by the press over many years' time. he gave that famous self-emulating cry when he retired from politics, as it turned out temporarily. in 1962, "just think what you're going to be missing. you won't have nixon to kick around anymore." and former alaska governor sarah palin when she gave her resignation speech in july of this year had some costic words for the news media. what some i think have recognized and i think actually richard nixon was among the first to recognize, was that there was political profit to be had in sparring with the news media. in fact, it was h.r.haldiman, the nixon chief of staff, who laid down the law no one is to refer to the press anymore, tower refer to the media. it sounded more sinister. we've seen mo
think, would diminish her. traditionally you know, andrea, you don't have henry kissinger and the secretary of defense out speaking in a -- >> that may not be the best example, because henry did a lot of things in the white house, he was both national security adviser and secretary of state. so he was bridging a lot of divides, on foreign policy. >> you don't have the secretary of state out on a political campaign. they and the secretary of defense are above and beyond that usually in a campaign and especially for hillary clinton, who has risen above the partisanship of the campaign, which was necessary to be secretary of state. already, a lot of her franchise is being outsourced to bill clinton, to richardson to mitchell, to biden, to -- i mean to dennis ross and to who wihol. she is losing the whole franchise. let me say one thing. i don't think she lost the franchise and effective as secretary of state, unfortunately because of a lot of issues tangled up, we didn't see a lot what she achieved on the africa trip. she continues to be a strong advocate, she commands the pu
. henry kissinger said this, a visit by the former president of the united states and married to the secretary of state will enable kim jong-il to convey to north koreans and perhaps to other countries that his country is being accepted into the and did this president just hand kim jong-il a propaganda victory? >> i don't think so. we've had this mission with the japanese, the chinese, russians, and we've had 100% support by all of these countries. the former president also asked for the release of south korean detainee and the japanese inductees, which we think would also be a great picture to achieve those unification of those families which are very concerned about. so i just think that we wanted to get those if girls out and north korea gave us a path to do that. by the way, if we haven't done that, we would be having a different conversation tonight -- today, because they would have said, well, you had an opportunity just to send the former president. >> to that point, former president clinton, he goes to kim joung ill and north korea, if you want a break through that's b
issue. >> rose: including the president of the united states and henry kissinger, and sam nunn. >> especially the gang around reagan. >> that's i think the beauty of it that it is something that the right wing republicans generally believe in. so it's something we may have a chance to do. >> rose: mutually assured destruction is not a good idea. >> i don't think it's a good idea. it works up to a point. it's not something we should rely on. >> rose: and do you think the united states, to lead the way, should reduce its stockpile of weapons by how much? >> i would say total. i mean i'd like-- >> rose: just go right out and get rid of all of them and show the world the right direction. >> that's what nixon did with biological weapons and it was a wonderful move. he did it youn laterally becausey so he didn't have to have it ratified by the senate. he didn't have to negotiate with anybody. we said if we get rid of our weapons we will destroy the stockpiles, and it happened one afternoon. >> rose: would woe be less of a nation? >> i don't think so pup. but that's a matter of opinio
about himself. you probably remember, i do, anyway, when one of secretary kissinger's books came out, like a thousand pages and somebody quipped if he left out the pronoun "i" it would have been 200 pages. senator kennedy is one of the few people i knew who could survive without the pronoun "i." he didn't talk about himself much. he didn't really need to but he just didn't do it. and, you know, there was a humility and other values about, that he had, that made him likeable. and it's worth noting. he accomplished a tremendous amount. not because he was there for 46 years you about way he behaved for that 46 years. you'll search in vain for a staffer who use today work for him who will say a bad word about him. everybody wanted to work for him. >> he had the best staff. they were so good. he was so strong. >> because he was so nice and good to them and respectful. he treated people well and it enabled him to accomplish a great deal. as ferocious as he was and partisan as he could be when arguing on a one on one basis with everyone that he interacted with, he was respectful and polite
of your predecessors, as national security advisor, particularly henry kissinger and some of the others but you are not seen in public all the time hovering next to the president. you are not seen as the gatekeeper who controls all of the foreign policy types of -- to get into see the president. do you have a different view of your job. >> i do. i think this is also a different century and i think the national security advisor runs an organization that deals from everything starting with climate change, and energy, all the way to cybersecurity, including the normal threats that we associate with the job, so it is very complex and we have economic issues we are concerned about and so i think -- >> particularly in terms of your role. >> i think... i think first of all, there is no problem with me seeing the president on any matter that he wants to discuss or i want to discuss. that is not a problem. i believe that there is a new way of doing business, to tee up the issues that are very complex, and span a huge, huge array of subjects, that each day a president has to deal with and i think
is if you work with hemind and if you stay active and do things, henry kissinger in his eighties who hops on airplanes every day going all over the world, my current planning horizon i have told my team is to plan out about 2016 when i will be 73. i want to see at american solutions in dandridge communications and productions which are the companies we have, how we can optimize my ability to be effective and helpful over the next decade or so. i think that is as far had want to look. >> host: san clemente, you are on the air. >> caller: thank you. mr. speaker it is a pleasure to talk too you. i have a book next emmy called and never call retreat which your gracious enough to sign for me. thank you very muc 16 years ago i started a research project and was watching a show called a civil war. i was fascinated by it and for 16 years i have been doing nothing but reading civil war books. my wife thinks i am boring. i stumbled across something about stephen a. douglas. he was a vile little man who had speculated on the real estate between chicago andllinois and the west cst. because he wanted
and george bush, but it was also the people working for them. it was the henry kissingers, the donald rumsfelds, who were also very involved in all of this. i think that as one of the callers pointed out, we don't say enough about how our government, our administrations have gone astray. guest: i think the last word, it's interesting to me, steve, that the callers show that the range of emotions -- emotions of the nixon presidency still exist. people can get pretty uptight about it. host: john mashek, stuart loory, thank you for being here on the 35th anniversary of richard nixon's resignation from the presidency. >> tomorrow on "washington journal," patrick kilbride discusses trade relations between the u.s., mexico, and canada. keith epstein talks about why health insurers are winning. brad sherman examines the u.s. policy toward afghanistan and pakistan. alexandra and philippe cuse toe discuss planet green's blue august special, examining the sustainability of the world's oceans. that's on "washington journal," live at 7:00 a.m. eastern. beginning tuesday, august 11, washington jou
kissinger and madeline albright, the former secretary of state stress in their opinion that north korea needed to have a deal in place before the end of the bush administration because regardless of the election, with the new administration tougher to get a deal. and my notes show here that the man i mentioned earlier, a big player in north korea responded by saying here's a hint. send somebody who is high enough up to deal with our leadership, and a deal will get done. it never got done, i think the best we can say about this looking with some optimism to it that the door has opened and we'll have to see where it goes from here, but make no mistake the north koreans, they're eager to keep their respect, but they're eager for the world to know this is their viewpoint that they're credible, they'll be tough negotiators on the nuclear weapons issue, but they do want to deal. >> larry: laura -- >> of course, it's a another matter. >> larry: laura called her family after she was detained. here's lisaling describing a phone call from her sister. >> she sounds scared, larry, absolutely terrif
it to henry kissinger. give it to henry kissinger. i think jimmy . . . here are my two questions. please do not evade them again to what branch of the military did you ever served, and what is your party affiliation? since you said you are evangelical, i am pretty sure you are one of the neocons. i am enjoying your book our this month. i hope to continue this. guest: i served in the army, i guest: i served in the army, i was a the army. i was not in thethe vietnam, but i served in a hospital in korea. i was horrified when i came back from korea because people were spitting on me and calling@@@@@ honestly, and embarrass republican. i do not agree but a lot of the positions that have been taken in the last few years within the republican party. questions. host: you write in the book about@@@@@@@@"" the truth is that the entire nightmare can be traced back to the liberal democratic policies and the old rural liberal left this -- leftist, jimmy carter. but wasn't it president bush's decision to go into iraq and afghanistan not based on carter policies, but based on the attacks of 9/11? guest: d
, henry kissinger said as he was the chief advisor for nixon, and others, that he thought his job was to negotiate the best -- second best place he could for the united states of america. because, these people believed that the totalitarian government was more efficient and could get things done better and could produce better. well, now we know that is not so. it is the free market that produces better. better things, more inventions. better quality of everything. and of course, in the years after ronald reagan failed to get the nomination in 1976, he and others were traveling the country, talking to little groups, redefining their conservative image. and he had a different view. he thought when it comes to dealing with the soviet union, he had another message. we win, they lose. and he made it work. and so -- [applause]. >> -- despite our belief that we couldn't win, we did win. it was a shock to a lot of us in 1980 when ronald reagan actually won and the same thing happened after clinton won in 1992. we couldn't believe it. and two years later we came back and had the biggest r
kissinger was across from me. and arms control experts were around us. i was this 30 year-old kid that had a way of trying to include everybody in the conversation. we were talking about a complicated arms control agreement. this discussion was going on, and all the sudden he looked at me and said, well, joe, what do the young people think about this? i did not know what to say, i did not want to make a fool of me. i reached over and pick an object up of the coffee table. i was nervous, and i was flipping it back and forth as i answered the question. i noticed everyone stiffened up when i was talking. the butler came in and said, time for dinner. everybody immediately got up and bolted for the dinner table. your debt grab, arm and said, put that thing down. that cost more than your house. i was flipping a faberge egg and my hands. the sophisticated kid from delaware -- [laughter] it seemed like every single thing i did, he was there. when my character was under attack, he said maybe i should not chair this committee until -- i said maybe i should not chair this committee until it gets sett
with henry kissinger and others who will be proposing that this is the final destination of a defense and security policy. with the nonproliferation treaty did, and what we are now proposing with this document, the road to 2010, was to imagine things. it is said that we should give -- was at two things. we should do so by them relinquishing or surrendering the idea that they would ever have nuclear weapons, but we would in return help them get civil nuclear power. what is said was that the nuclear states themselves would seek to reduce their nuclear weapons. this is still, in my view, the nature of a bargain, a covenant between states and the world, that as we renew the non- proliferation treaty, we get an understanding that in return for relinquishing nuclear weapons, including iran and other countries, relinquishing the possibility of having nuclear weapons or having them secretly, we will say will make it possible for you to get access to facilities that will need to be there. we will do it on the conditions that it is safe and not leading to the creation of nuclear weapons. there
fighting along the border could escalate, and there were these soviet proposals asking henry kissinger, well, you know, what if t soviet union decided to destroy china's nuclear capabilities? how would the u.s. respond? you don't want to get into that kind of scenario because of the unpredictable conquences. so where is it now, it's not the kind of, it's not a direct security threat at the present. now, china itself is going to prent security problems for the united states as it continues to evolve economically, militarily. how the russians play into that will be a factor, but it's not the main factor. the main factor is that the chinese-americans i still think have very difrent visions of where they want to see the world evolve, and you're seeing that now in the contest of sovereignty over the south china sea. again, the chinese haven't directly confronted the united states. it's not clear that china will become a major security threat to the united states, but insofar as this economy can strengthen, that gives them military potential. it's a latent potential that could become a probl
to be even-tempered no matter how bad of a mood you are in. you can't. brian: i'm thinking kissinger, colin powell, cyrus vance. steve: married to a former president. brian: i feel so overdressed. dari: sneakers with the no laces. >> it's august. you know what i mean? steve: i love it. >> brian, you were on vacation. let him ease into it. steve: glenn, we will be watching today at 5:00 eastern time. >> health care. you won't see it any place else. dari: two counties with the exact same unemployment rate. why did one get a bunch of stimulus cash and the other got nearly nothing? it's the stimulus program, is it really working? a look at the major disconnect. brian: then, this guy was apparently a little bit tired and he onned while in court. the judge on duty was having none of it the punishment? you won't believe it, for yawning. that's a-- tiny netbook. yeah, it's-- good-looking, lightweight. generally awesome. and you could just-- go online, video-chat with my cousin. this is un-- under $200. are you some kind of-- mind reader, visionary ? no, i have them. huh. the new lightweight hp mini
this administration. henry kissinger said the classic government memo is option three. option one all-out nuclear war. option two, unilateral surrender. you take option three, somewhere in between. you compromise of that's what we're doing in afghanistan. we're ruling out massive buildup, rule out doing nothing, we do the third option. incremental. it can get you in a little more trouble, a little more. >> who is the strong hand in the white house now? i know there are a lot of people over there that are very good at what they do. i don't see the strong hand in the white house. the james baker iii, clark clifford that goes to the president and says this is what we need to do. >> it's not clear it's there right now. you don't have a lot of people there that have executive branch experience. you're talking about amalgam of domestic security with policy with gold old-fashioned governing issues. it's not clear it's come together this. administration is still young. i'd be surprised if you didn't see changes in personnel or procedures or both. >> let's go to must read op-eds and start with the "washington
kissinger said one as the chief adviser for nixon and others that he thought his job was to negotiate the best second best place he could put the u.s. the has and these people believed the totalitarian government was more efficient, and get things done better and could produce better well, now i know that is not so. it is the free market that produces better. better things, more conventions from a better quality of everything. and, of course, in the years after ronald reagan failed to get the nomination in 1976 he and others were traveling the country talking to little groups, redefine in their conservative image. in and he had a different view. he thought when it comes to dealing with the soviet union he had another message. we win, they lose and he made it work. [applause] and so despite our beliefs that we cannot win he did win, it was a big shock to a lot of us in 1980 when ronald reagan actually wind and then the same thing happened after clinton won in 1992. we cannot believe it feared a two years later we came and have the biggest republican victory and i think it was 40 years
that anymore. you don't see the stature of a henry kissinger. you see dancing. that juxtaposition i think makes it difficult in the long run. >> give her some time. she's only been in office a few months. we'll see how she does as she compares with john foster dull lus. >> i've danced with hillary. she's a great dancer. she can cut a rug. >> when he went in that diplomat iqbal room at the state department, he wowed everyone. >> there you go. there you go. >> where should michael jackson be buried? the king of pop's brother jermaine jackson talks about his wishes and draws some comparisons to elvis presley. >>> and retired u.s. general tony zinny, the former commander of the u.s. military central command talks about fighting the taliban, but he also was supposed to become the u.s. ambassador to iraq. what happened? >> i kind of feel like charlie brown. >>> a u.s. missile strike is believed to have killed a top commander in pakistan. baitullah mesud is suspected of having a role in the assassination of benazir bhutto. what would his death mean for al qaeda and the taliban? >>> and joining us now,
it to henry kissinger. i think jimmy carter was an honorable man. here are my two questions. please do not evade them again to what branch of the military did you ever served, and what is your party affiliation? since you said you are evangelical, i am pretty sure you are one of the neocons. i am enjoying your book our this month. i hope to continue this. guest: i served in the army, i was a medic in the army. i was not in thethe vietnam, but i served in a hospital in korea. i was horrified when i came back from korea because people were spitting on me and calling me a baby killer. that is the military i served in. politically, i am a republican. honestly, and embarrassed republican but i don't agree with a lot of the positions that have been taken by the republican party. i hope i answered your questions. host: you write in the book about the war in iraq. "while the liberal left in america at screams about the mess in iraq and the war on terror have been caused by the republican presidency of george w. bush, the truth is that the entire nightmare can be traced back to the liberal demo
appearances by secretary of states. kissinger didn't do those things when he traveled. >> the first week alone there were 22 speeches. and now this is the second week. >> i think she's doing a remarkable job as secretary of state. i think she's the right person at the right time. i'm just surprised t. again, this story surprises me for one reason and one reason only because hillary clinton, i think, has shown more discipline than any public figure and i don't mean this as an insult, since nixon, somebody that got kicked around, just lied about, beaten up day in and day out and hillary always kept going. >> but, see, i kind of liked it. i liked hearing her say, you know what? hello? it's about me. i'm secretary of state and take a look at the work i'm doing. stop it. i just think finally it's good to hear. >> and when she teared up, remember, in new hampshire, she won new hampshire. >> exactly where there was a town hall meeting yesterday. >> overstating how negative that might be. let's get to the must-read op-eds. sarah palin was right the second time. we do need to turn down the rhetorical h
the actual fighting on the border could escalate and there is the soviet proposals asking henry kissinger well, what if the soviet union decides to destroy china's's and emerging ki blease? how would in response? you don't want to get in that kind of scenario because the consequences. so, it would perhaps make them like differently but it's not a direct security threat at present. china itself is going to present security problems as it continues to evolve economically and militarily. how the russians plan that will be a factor but it's not the main factor. the main factor is the chinese-americans -- i still think have different visions where they nt to see the world evolves and you e that now over sovereignty and the south china sea. again the chi have the united states often worked out and it's not clear the chinese will become a major security threat to the united states but insofar as the econo to strengthen and dhat gives military potential it is a latent potential that could become a problem and how russia plays into that will be a factor but not a major factor. >> we have time for
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